I First International Conference Women in Modern Philosophy (Rio de Janeiro, June 17-20, 2019) Rio de Janeiro State University – UERJ Call for submissions

The First International Conference on Women of Modern Philosophy will be held in Rio de Janeiro, 17th to 20th June 2019).

Rio de Janeiro is a national center of Early Modern Philosophy. All Brazilian researchers who confirmed participation in the meeting are heirs of that school of reading the history of philosophy with a method of conceptual analysis, with deep respect to the letter of the historical text. It will be a joyous occasion for the beginning of an exchange and network on Early Moderh Philosophy’s research with an eye to the rewriting of the philosophical canon.

The meeting is already on its preliminary arrangements. Works on the thoughts of Elisabeth of Bohemia, Margareth Cavendish, Catharine Trotter Cockburn, The two “Sophies”, Cristina of Sweden, Anne Conway, Émilie Du Châtelet, among other women, are expected.

Topic areas

Cartesian account of will

Judgment and will in Seventeenth Century

The role os letters…

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‘Origenian Platonisme’ in Interregnum Cambridge: Three Academic Texts by George Rust, 1656 and 1658

“‘Origenian Platonisme’ in Interregnum Cambridge: Three Academic Texts by George Rust, 1656 and 1658”, edited by Marilyn A. Lewis, Davide A. Secci, and Christian Hengstermann, with assistance from John H. Lewis, and Benjamin Williams, History of Universities, vol. XXX / 1-2, pp. 43-124, published 3 August 2017.

Abstract:

Building on Professor Sarah Hutton’s designation of the years 1658-1662 as an ‘Origenist moment in English theology’, this article adds substantial detail to our knowledge of what Marilyn Lewis describes as an ‘Origenian Platonist’ moment. The article presents English translations of three Latin academic texts, written by George Rust in 1656 and 1658 while he was a fellow of Christ’s College, Cambridge. The first text, Messias in S. Scriptura promissus olim venit should be assigned to Rust’s fulfilment in 1656 of the requirement to dispute in the Divinity Schools in the University of Cambridge in order to qualify for the degree of Bachelor of Divinity. The second and third texts were presented at the annual University of Cambridge Commencement Day in 1658, when Rust incepted BD. His Act verses, Resurrectionem e mortuis Scriptura docet nec refragatur Ratio and Anima separata non dormit appeared on a souvenir broadsheet for the day, and the final text, Resurrectionem è Mortuis S. Scriptura tradit, nec refragatur Ratio was the discourse which Rust defended in the disputation. Not only are these two 1658 texts important additions to the writings constituting the ‘Origenian Platonist moment’, but a reconstruction of the Commencement on 5 and 6 July will show that they formed part of what was perhaps the most public exposition and celebration of Origenian Platonist doctrines in Interregnum Cambridge.

Link: History of Universities, XXX (2017)

The Cambridge Platonist Research Group

Marilyn Lewis has drawn our attention to the following publication, which will be of interest to all readers of Cambridge Platonist texts:

” ‘Origenian Platonisme’ in Interregnum Cambridge: Three Academic Texts by George Rust, 1656 and 1658″, edited by Marilyn A. Lewis, Davide A. Secci, and Christian Hengstermann, with assistance from John H. Lewis, and Benjamin Williams, History of Universities, vol. XXX / 1-2, pp. 43-124, published 3 August 2017.

Abstract: “Building on Professor Sarah Hutton’s designation of the years 1658-1662 as an ‘Origenist moment in English theology’, this article adds substantial detail to our knowledge of what Marilyn Lewis describes as an ‘Origenian Platonist’ moment. The article presents English translations of three Latin academic texts, written by George Rust in 1656 and 1658 while he was a fellow of Christ’s College, Cambridge. The first text, Messias in S. Scriptura promissus olim venit should be assigned to Rust’s fulfilment in…

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British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25.5 (2017): Cambridge Platonism, edited by Sarah Hutton

British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25.5 (2017): Cambridge Platonism, edited by Sarah Hutton

Contents

  • Introduction: The Cambridge Platonists: Some New Studies, Sarah Hutton, 851-857; full-text available here.
  • Patrides, Plotinus and the Cambridge Platonists, Stephen R. L. Clark, 858-877
  • Descartes and More on the infinity of the world, Igor Agostini, 878-896
  • ‘In human shape to become the very beast!’ – Henry More on animals, Cecilia Muratori, 897-915
  • Henry More as reader of Marcus Aurelius, John Sellars, 916-931
  • Gods and giants: Cudworth’s platonic metaphysics and his ancient theology, Douglas Hedley, 932-953
  • Cudworth on superintellectual instinct as inclination to the good, David Leech, 954-970
  • Pre-existence and universal salvation – the Origenian renaissance in early modern Cambridge, Christian Hengstermann, 971-989
  • Time, space, and process in Anne Conway, Emily Thomas, 990-1010
  • Three texts on the Kabbalah: More, Wachter, Leibniz, and the philosophy of the Hebrews, Mogens Lærke, 1011-1030
  • Whichcote, Shaftesbury and Locke: Shaftesbury’s critique of Locke’s epistemology and moral philosophy, Friedrich A. Uehlein, 1031-1048