British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25.5 (2017): Cambridge Platonism, edited by Sarah Hutton

British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25.5 (2017): Cambridge Platonism, edited by Sarah Hutton

Contents

  • Introduction: The Cambridge Platonists: Some New Studies, Sarah Hutton, 851-857; full-text available here.
  • Patrides, Plotinus and the Cambridge Platonists, Stephen R. L. Clark, 858-877
  • Descartes and More on the infinity of the world, Igor Agostini, 878-896
  • ‘In human shape to become the very beast!’ – Henry More on animals, Cecilia Muratori, 897-915
  • Henry More as reader of Marcus Aurelius, John Sellars, 916-931
  • Gods and giants: Cudworth’s platonic metaphysics and his ancient theology, Douglas Hedley, 932-953
  • Cudworth on superintellectual instinct as inclination to the good, David Leech, 954-970
  • Pre-existence and universal salvation – the Origenian renaissance in early modern Cambridge, Christian Hengstermann, 971-989
  • Time, space, and process in Anne Conway, Emily Thomas, 990-1010
  • Three texts on the Kabbalah: More, Wachter, Leibniz, and the philosophy of the Hebrews, Mogens Lærke, 1011-1030
  • Whichcote, Shaftesbury and Locke: Shaftesbury’s critique of Locke’s epistemology and moral philosophy, Friedrich A. Uehlein, 1031-1048
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Charles Taliaferro: “Black Lives, Sex, and Revealed Religion Matter! Contrasting Kantian Philosophy of Religion with Cambridge Platonism”

Charles Taliaferro, “Black Lives, Sex, and Revealed Religion Matter! Contrasting Kantian Philosophy of Religion with Cambridge Platonism,” Philosophia Christi 16.2 (Summer 2017): 81-97.

 

 

Hedley: Gods and giants: Cudworth’s platonic metaphysics and his ancient theology

British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-22 (forthcoming)

Abstract:
The Cambridge Platonists are modern thinkers and the context of seventeenth-century Cambridge science is an inalienable and decisive part of their thought. Cudworth’s interest in ancient theology, however, seems to conflict with the progressive aspect of his philosophy. The problem of the nature, however, of this ‘Platonism’ is unavoidable. Even in his complex and recondite ancient theology Cudworth is motivated by philosophical considerations, and his legacy among philosophers in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries should not be overlooked. In particular we will draw on the scholarship of the German Egyptologist Jan Assmann in order to reassess the significance of Cudworth’s theory of religion for later philosophical developments.

 

https://philpapers.org/rec/HEDGAG