The Resurrection Body in the Cambridge Platonists

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John Russell Roberts on Berkeley and Cambridge Platonism

John Russell Roberts, “A Puzzle in the Three Dialogues and Its Platonic Resolution,” in Stefan Storrie, ed., Berkeley’s Three Dialogues: New Essays (Oxford, 2018). DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198755685.003.0010

This essay suggests that Berkeley’s Neoplatonism may be profitably viewed as developed under the influence of Cambridge Platonism. A brief account of some key aspects of Cambridge Platonism are reviewed, specifically the central idea of the Image of God Doctrine (IGD) and Cudworth’s Axiarchism. Then possible points of influence of these aspects on Berkeley’s views are explored. In support of its possible usefulness, this approach to Berkeley’s Neoplatonism is used to shed light on his otherwise puzzling embrace of the pure intellect and abstract ideas. If Berkeley is drawing on the Cambridge Platonism tradition in the way suggested, he can have his pure intellect and its innate ideas without dragging along a commitment to a faculty of abstraction and its abstract ideas. Instead, the pure intellect is seen as a reflective faculty directed to the perfectly particular, concrete self.

 

British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25.5 (2017): Cambridge Platonism, edited by Sarah Hutton

British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25.5 (2017): Cambridge Platonism, edited by Sarah Hutton

Contents

  • Introduction: The Cambridge Platonists: Some New Studies, Sarah Hutton, 851-857; full-text available here.
  • Patrides, Plotinus and the Cambridge Platonists, Stephen R. L. Clark, 858-877
  • Descartes and More on the infinity of the world, Igor Agostini, 878-896
  • ‘In human shape to become the very beast!’ – Henry More on animals, Cecilia Muratori, 897-915
  • Henry More as reader of Marcus Aurelius, John Sellars, 916-931
  • Gods and giants: Cudworth’s platonic metaphysics and his ancient theology, Douglas Hedley, 932-953
  • Cudworth on superintellectual instinct as inclination to the good, David Leech, 954-970
  • Pre-existence and universal salvation – the Origenian renaissance in early modern Cambridge, Christian Hengstermann, 971-989
  • Time, space, and process in Anne Conway, Emily Thomas, 990-1010
  • Three texts on the Kabbalah: More, Wachter, Leibniz, and the philosophy of the Hebrews, Mogens Lærke, 1011-1030
  • Whichcote, Shaftesbury and Locke: Shaftesbury’s critique of Locke’s epistemology and moral philosophy, Friedrich A. Uehlein, 1031-1048