The Resurrection Body in the Cambridge Platonists

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‘Origenian Platonisme’ in Interregnum Cambridge: Three Academic Texts by George Rust, 1656 and 1658

“‘Origenian Platonisme’ in Interregnum Cambridge: Three Academic Texts by George Rust, 1656 and 1658”, edited by Marilyn A. Lewis, Davide A. Secci, and Christian Hengstermann, with assistance from John H. Lewis, and Benjamin Williams, History of Universities, vol. XXX / 1-2, pp. 43-124, published 3 August 2017.

Abstract:

Building on Professor Sarah Hutton’s designation of the years 1658-1662 as an ‘Origenist moment in English theology’, this article adds substantial detail to our knowledge of what Marilyn Lewis describes as an ‘Origenian Platonist’ moment. The article presents English translations of three Latin academic texts, written by George Rust in 1656 and 1658 while he was a fellow of Christ’s College, Cambridge. The first text, Messias in S. Scriptura promissus olim venit should be assigned to Rust’s fulfilment in 1656 of the requirement to dispute in the Divinity Schools in the University of Cambridge in order to qualify for the degree of Bachelor of Divinity. The second and third texts were presented at the annual University of Cambridge Commencement Day in 1658, when Rust incepted BD. His Act verses, Resurrectionem e mortuis Scriptura docet nec refragatur Ratio and Anima separata non dormit appeared on a souvenir broadsheet for the day, and the final text, Resurrectionem è Mortuis S. Scriptura tradit, nec refragatur Ratio was the discourse which Rust defended in the disputation. Not only are these two 1658 texts important additions to the writings constituting the ‘Origenian Platonist moment’, but a reconstruction of the Commencement on 5 and 6 July will show that they formed part of what was perhaps the most public exposition and celebration of Origenian Platonist doctrines in Interregnum Cambridge.

Link: History of Universities, XXX (2017)

The Cambridge Platonist Research Group

Marilyn Lewis has drawn our attention to the following publication, which will be of interest to all readers of Cambridge Platonist texts:

” ‘Origenian Platonisme’ in Interregnum Cambridge: Three Academic Texts by George Rust, 1656 and 1658″, edited by Marilyn A. Lewis, Davide A. Secci, and Christian Hengstermann, with assistance from John H. Lewis, and Benjamin Williams, History of Universities, vol. XXX / 1-2, pp. 43-124, published 3 August 2017.

Abstract: “Building on Professor Sarah Hutton’s designation of the years 1658-1662 as an ‘Origenist moment in English theology’, this article adds substantial detail to our knowledge of what Marilyn Lewis describes as an ‘Origenian Platonist’ moment. The article presents English translations of three Latin academic texts, written by George Rust in 1656 and 1658 while he was a fellow of Christ’s College, Cambridge. The first text, Messias in S. Scriptura promissus olim venit should be assigned to Rust’s fulfilment in…

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The Cambridge Origenists (Münster, 2013)

Alfons Fürst und Christian Hengstermann, eds. The Cambridge Origenists. George Rust’s Letter of Resolution Concerning Origen and the Chief of His Opinions. Adamantiana, 4. Münster, 2013.

Not only are the years between 1658–1662 an era of important political change, but also “an Origenist moment in English theology” (Sarah Hutton). Besides a major edition of Origen’s highly influential Contra Celsum, Cambridge Platonism at that time produced entire religious philosophies informed by Origen’s metaphysical genius, culminating in the works of Henry More and his pupils at Christ’s College and Ragley Hall. Undoubtedly, the crowning achievement of Cambridge Origenism is the later bishop George Rust’s Letter of Resolution Concerning Origen and the Chief of His Opinions, which, published anonymously in 1661, sparked heated discussions on the soul’s pre-existence and fall and the restoration of all things at once. It offers both the first sustained defence of Origenism ever and a daring manifesto of the Cambridge Platonists’ liberal early modern moral and religious philosophy. To this end, Rust, engaging in a critical dialogue with the new philosophies of René Descartes and Thomas Hobbes and Calvinistic theology throughout, adopts basic insights of Origen’s theology, elaborating upon them in the light of the crucial controversies of his day. The fourth volume of the Adamantiana series gives a systematic reappraisal of Cambridge Origenism at large as well as an in-depth study of its key work, the anonymous Letter of Resolution. Its historical introduction and its six treatises on Origen’s “chief doctrines” are all analyzed in detail and with regard both to the use of sources and the systematic merit in the fields of ethics and metaphysics. Moreover, the volume includes a representative selection of key texts of the leading Cambridge Origenists Henry More, George Rust and Joseph Glanvill, which are given both in modernized spelling and with first German translations.